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St. Thomas' Hospital in Southwark, London was the owner of most of the land and property in Hastingleigh
After it being granted to the Royal Hospitals in a 1553 charter, and remained as landlords until 1902
when their estates in Hastingleigh were auctioned in to private ownership.

Because of this rather unusual arrangement of being Governed by a charitable institution for so many years
many of the records of correspondence relating to the Hastingleigh estate were preserved and give an interesting
insight in to the events of the past 400 years or more.

Here I have listed some of those letters and notes relating to Hastingleigh, which can be found in the archives
for St. Thomas', which are now held in the Metropolitan Archives of London.
Inevitably there will be occasions where I have misinterpreted
some writing, for which I apologise in advance.
Certain words and terms which crop up regularly but are no longer familiar in modern English, can be found on the
Glossary Link to the right of this page.


Date
Year
Letters of Correspondence or Committee Notes
20-Feb
1681

Whereas upon a mistake £8.6.8d per annum had been charged for the quit rent of the Manors of Combe Grove and Fanscomb in the County of Kent occasioned as far as can appear by making that sum received as one year's quit rent in the audited book of accounts which indeed accrued in several years and so transferring that sum from year to year in future year's accounts hitherto.
As the annual rent has made a great arrear more than it due whereas £2.13.7d is the most can be found by the Surveys and Rent rolls and inquire at a court to be the annual rent besides hens and eggs all which appearing to the auditors at the last general audit it is ordered that what to surcharge in the accounts in arrears above the annual rent of £2.13.7d be discharged and that from henceforth the charge be but £2.13.7d per annum for the said quit rents besides hens and eggs
11-Nov
1681

Sir,
Thomas Player our tenant of Combe Farme in Kent acquainted the Court that the farmhouse and outhouses were out of repair and that he is now upon the making of them, and prayed that timber may be assigned him for doing of it according to the covenant in his lease in that behalf; whereupon it is ordered that the committee do take care that so much as shall be needful for the said repairs be forthwith assigned accordingly.
16-Feb
1685

On consideration had of the report of the said Grand Committee of Governors of this Hospital that Mr Thomas Kentish on the the Governors thereof and Mr Legg had lately taken a journey to several Parishes of Hastingleigh, Wye and Crundale in the county of Kent and there viewed and made an estimate of the considerable quantities of timber and underwood belonging to the Hospital and reported the same to the said committee whereby the said Committee were of better enabled to sell the said timber and underwood for the true and full value thereof. It is referred to the standing Committee of this Hospital this day appointed for the ordering the affairs thereof to express the grateful sentiments of this house for the so single and particular service of the said Mr Kentish and Mr Legg by making fitting presents to them respectively the charge of this house as a due acknowledgment thereof or otherwise as the said Committee shall think fit.
1686
1686

Upon consideration had of the great service done to this house by Mr Thomas Kentish and Mr Lege in their taking a journey to the several parishes of Hastingleigh, Wye and Crundale in the County of Kent to view and in their having viewed and made an estimate of the considerable quantities of timber and underwood there belonging to this Hospital for the enabling the house to sell the same (and has been since done) to the true and full value thereof.
Ordered that two guineas be presented to each of them the said Mr Thomas Kentish and Mr Lege as a grateful acknowledgement of their respective service done to the house in the p..missed.
18-Mar
1686

And whereas it appeared by the report of the committee at a meeting thereof in the Hospital hall the 18th day of March 1686 upon a treaty then had by the said committee which William Milman of the Inner Temple London c?ent remaining a lease to be made to him the said William Milman or to his executors, administrators or assigned of all these the sites of the Manors of Comb Grove and Fanscombe with the appurtenances situate lying and being in the parishes of Hastingleigh, Wye and Crundale in the county of Kent belonging to this hospital by virtue of an Indenture of [Pea?y] thereof and holden thereof now inspected bearing the date the 17th day of February Anno Domini 1653 made by the then Governor of the possessions and [re.enewd(?)] and goods of this Hospital to Thomas Player then Esquire afterwards Knight for a term not yet expired the tenant right of which is now come unto and vested in the said William Milman
the committee then came to the following agreement with the said William Milman concerning the promised; to wit/that he, the said William Milman, his executors, administrators or assigned shall pay into the hands of the treasurer or clerk of this Hospital for the time being for the use of this Hospital the sum of Two Hundred and Eighty pounds at or before the end of Easter term next coming for a lease agreed to be made in convenient time afterwards by indenture to him the said William Milman or to the executors, administrators or assigned of the promised except as in the before mentioned indenture by which the same are now holden is excepted and for a term of One and Twenty years to commence at the expiration of the said former term at and under the life rent of 50 per annum as is reserved in and by the said former indenture of lease and all other covenants and conditions (the necessary changes having been made) as are in the said former indenture of lease contained.
This court ordered that a lease be forthwith made to the said William Milman his executors, administrators or assigned of the said bargain...
promises according to the said agreement and that in convenient time the Trustees appointed by the ........ set or of patents for the letting and disposing of the lands and tenements belonging etc to this Hospital to be applied to for the sealing and executing the same
14-Sep
1687

Upon consideration had of the great service done to this house by Mr Thomas Kentish and Mr Legg in their taking a journey to the several parishes of Hastingleigh Wye and Crundale in the County of Kent to view etc. in their having viewed and made an estimate of considerable quantities of timber and underwood there belonging to this Hospital for the enabling the house to sell the same (as has been since done) to the true and full value thereof ordered that two Guineas be presented to each of them the said Mr Thomas Kentish and Mr Legg as grateful acknowledgement of their respective service done to the house in the premises
06-Jun
1689

John Sherman to have a lease of the farms of Hastingleigh and Aldelose late held by Thomas Crux for Twenty Oe years from Michaelmas next of the present rent of Fifty pounds and Ten shillings per annum and Two Hundred and Sixty Pounds fine. Where of One Hundred and Sixty pounds to be paid in hand and the other Hundred pounds after sealing. Both sums are paid. 
17-Mar
1692

Mr Leman offered £45 per annum for a lease of 7 or 9 years of the biggest house in Pat-nred(?) but was bad to offer £50. The Treasurer and 2 or 3 of the committee nearest desired to let it and the other house go Thursday next to sell out trees to be sold at Orpington 3 acres of under wood allowed Sir W. Honywood to make good the wood fences
Mr Russell
04-May
1692

The committee agreed to allow Sarah Ashdowne [of Court Lodge] 35 shillings towards repairs of the buildings on Hastingleigh farm late Crux's.
24-Aug
1692

Sir William Honeywood agreement for Hastingleigh farm accompt agreed.
24-Aug
1692

And after the reading and confirmation of the orders and business of the last court it was ordered as followeth (vizt)

Whereas this court did lately grant to Mr Sherman a lease of the farm of Hastingleigh and Aldelose in the County of Kent for the term of Twenty One years from Michaelmas 1689 for a fine of Two Hundred and Sixty pounds, and the yearly rent of Fifty pounds and Ten shillings. And he aforesaid signed the order or grant of the said lease to one Sarah Ashdowne who paid the said fine, and since assigned her interest to Sir William Honywood Bart.
But because Mr Crux the late tenant had suffered the housing to run out of repairs he was prosecuted at Law on his covenant for repairs. And what was to be recovered was to be allowed the said Sherman or his assigns towards making good of the repairs, and somewhat being obtained though not so much the costs thereof will come to the Grand Committee thought fit and this Court doth allow that the sum of Thirty Five pounds be paid to the said Sir William Honywood to make good the said repairs, and this Court doth further order, that in consideration of the sum of Two Hundred and Five Pounds more to be paid by the said Sir William Honywood by way of fine, he shall have a lease made to him of the said farms for the term of Twenty one years from Michaelmas next at the yearly rent of Thirty pounds to be paid half yearly and with usual covenants except that with relation to Boots other than as to repairs in compensation whereof.
It is agreed that there shall be a clause inserted in the said hereby granted lease that he shall be allowed two acres of underwood per annum to be assigned for so many years as in that proportion shall be [left] behind when our woods there adjoining are felled from time to time.
To be disposed as the tenant shall think fit And that Twenty tun of timber shall be also be allowed at the next fall of timber in the said woods. If so much have before been used in repairing the housing on the said farms in the mean time. And that Forty shillings per annum be allowed during the said term for the tenants being woodreeve to take care of all our woods there adjoining, and a letter of Attorney inserted for that purpose and for collecting and retaining the quit rents and royalties of the said Manors. 
07-Jul
1698

Sir William Honeywood prayed to have £4 per annum allowed him for looking after the woods at Wye and Hastingleigh whereas his lease mentions but 40 shillings per annum for both, therefore the Committee acquainted him it was not in their power to grant him his request and desired him to justice no further upon it.
04-May
1698

Mr. Kingsford tenant to this Hospital of Comb farm in Kent prayed to have a Allowance for rough timber for repairs of his house and out housing, there being not timber upon the premises wherewith to repair the same. It was therefore ordered that the said Mr. Kingsford have liberty to fell what timber is upon the premises for repairing thereof as far as it will go at present.
Ordered that the underwoods of and belonging to the woods at Comb, Wye and Hastingleigh be felled next season.
08-May
1699

Discoursed the said Mr. Kingsford he having been fully informed by Sir William Honywood of the necessity of the present repairing to prevent falling some part of the building and therefore directed the said Mr. Kingsford to procure timber as shall be wanting and set the work in hand with all expedition and giving an account of the expense allowance shall be for rough timber as shall appear to be expended
24-Aug
1699

And we further certify that we have sold the underwood growing in the Two woods called Culverhill Wood and Richard's and Bird's wood within our Manor of Combe in the County of Kent to John Kingsford of Canterbury Esq . for One Hundred and Forty pounds clear of all charges and he to fence and secure the woods against cattle and to leave all the young oaks growing and forty tillers or wavers of ash or beech at the least upon every acre and if Culverhill wood shall appear to be above eight acres and a half, Mr Kingsford is to pay the overplus after the rate of Seven pounds per acre.
19-Sep
1701

Ordered that a committee be appointed to fell and digree of the underwoods at Hastingleigh and other places in Kent, and there upon the Treasurer Mr Brownsmith, Mr Cartwright, Mr Dep Tooley, Mr Gray, Mr Evans and Mr Taylor were named for the said committee and they or any three of them have power to fell the said underwood upon such terms as they shall think fit and to report their proceedings to this committee.

Grand Committee 19 Sept 1701
Minutes of last Grand Committee read and approved
Report made by the committee appointed to dispose of the underwoods at Hastingleigh and other places in Kent, of their proceedings therein, read, and the sale of Culverhill wood and Richard and Bird Wood to John Kingsford Esq. Therein reported approved and confirmed. And the matters contained in the report relating to underwood and timber felled by Sir William Honeywood referred to the next committee.
Ordered that a letter be sent to Mr Kingsford to desire him to employ some fit person to view the wood felled last year by Sir William Honeywood and to take an account on the number or timber trees there cut down, and to endeavour to see the Timber Trees and to measure the same and send an Account thereof to the Treasurer... 
25-Jul
1702

Ordered that some workman be sent down to see whether Mr. Kingsford's house at Combe in Kent be put into repair, and it is referred to Mr Treasurer to appoint the person and time of going.

The committee was informed that Sir William Honywood lets our farm at Hastingleigh and Aldelose at £76 per annum to Mr Crux and the underwoods (which are about 27 acres) belong to the Hospital And Mr Treasurer acquainted the committee that Sir William Honeywood had lately proposed to renew his lease of the said farm at Hastingleigh and Aldelose (which expires at Michaelmas 1713) and to give £250 Fine for Addition of 21 years at the old rent of £30 per annum but he insists to have the woods included in this new lease and it appearing by information as above that Sir William lets the said farm for £76 per annum without the woods, And that £465 was formerly paid for the fine for this estate without the said woods. This committee is of opinion that the said offer is much short of the value, and therefore absolutely refuses the same, And orders that Sir William be acquainted therewith, and that if he does not forthwith make a much better offer the committee will publish the same to be Let to the best bidder.
And it is the opinion of the committee that the woods shall hereafter let with the said farm and that the old rent of £50 and paid before the present lease to Sir William shall be reserved again upon the next lease, And that besides the usual covenants the tenant shall be obliged to leave 20 acres of fallow ploughed in before the end of July in the last year of his lease of such land as has been usually sowed with wheat and shall be restrained from breaking upon ploughing the downs and shall be obliged to fell the underwoods according to the covenants in the lease to Mr Swayne of Combe farm there next adjoining. 
25-Jul
1702

Mr Treasurer reported from the subcommittee to whom the matter relating to Sir William Honeywood was referred the 10th February last, That they had treated with Sir William and had adjusted the accompt with him for the two acres of land of underwood due to him by his lease in lieu of all boots, to Michaelmas next, and that these will be then due to the Hospital £0.3.11 And that as to the 27 Timber trees felled by Sir William in 1700 in Becks or Aldelose Wood in Kent it appears to the said committee that he felled the same without any order from this house and is thereby guilty of a great waste and the rather for that the trees were young and by Sir Williams accompt admea..and but to Five tunn or thereabouts.
And upon the hearing of which report this committee orders that unless Sir William Honeywood relieves this house from the remainder of the 20 tun of wood agreed to be allowed him [....]
Requires he shall be proceeded against at law for felling the said trees. 
09-Oct
1702

We have treated with Sir William Honywood Bart. Our tenant of the Demesne lands of Hastingleigh etc in Kent in relation to the matters referred to us by the last general court and we have thereapon adjusted with him the accounts for the two acres per annum of underwood due to him by his lease in lieu of all boots to Michaelmas 1702: And find that there will be then due to the hospital Three perches Eleven rood and as to the Thirty Seven young timber trees felled by him Anno 1700: in Becks also Adelose Wood
In Hastingleigh it appeared to us that he felled the same without any manner of order from this hospital and is thereby guilty of a very Great waste and spoil and the greater in that the trees were young
And by his own account all of them and measured but to Five tun or thereabouts And it appearing to us that Sir William Honeywood was by the contract made upon his taking the lease to be allowed Twenty tun of rough timber for repairs and he having had but Ten tun before he committed this waste we are of the opinion that unless he consented to release the remainder of the said contract he should be forthwith proceeded against at law for felling the said trees. 
20-Mar
1703

Sir William Honeywood our tenant to lands at Hastingleigh in Kent attended and desired an allowance for damage done by the late storm to the barn and other buildings, the consideration whereof and of the matter relating to the cut down by Sir William was deferred till Sir William Honeywood comes next to town which he says he intends in the next term.
1705
1705

We have sold to Sir William Honeywood Bart. Several parcels of underwood in our woods at Hastingleigh and Wye in the County of Kent
Vizt: All the underwoods in Read Wood and Lynn Wood in Hastingleigh at Nine Pounds per acre and in Haines Wood, Hurst Wood and the oldest growth in Gillnash Wood and those parts of Culverhill Wood now commonly called Richmores Wood and Hares Spring lying in Hastingleigh and Wye at Six Pounds Five Shillings per acre.
He is to cut Read wood, Lynn wood and Gillnash wood the next fall, and to have liberty to cut the rest the next fall after,
He is to leave Tallers according to custom and to fence the woods substantially for preserving the young springs He is to pay for the same at Michaelmas next:/ 
17-Oct
1705

Minutes of the Grand Committee read and approved
Mr Treasurer reported the view and sales of underwoods at Hastingleigh and Coomb, by himself, Sir James Collett, Mr Llyde, Mr Cole and Mr Mount which the committee well liked and approved. 
13-Feb
1707

It is referred to Mr Treasurer, Mr Halsey, Mr Cole, Mr Mount, Mr Micklethwaite, Mr Hakell and Mr Baker or any two of them to look into the differences between this Hospital and Sir William Honeywood touching the woods at Hastingleigh and Combe in Kent and to state and report the same with their opinion to this committee.
29-Mar
1707

Mr Mount acquainted the committee that he received a letter from Sir William Honeywood date 29 March 1707 informing him that several trees in the Hospital's woods at Hastingleigh in Kent are decaying and fit to be felled-
It is ordered that Mr Mount be desired to write to his brother to wait on Sir William Honeywood and to view and mark out such trees as he thinks fit to be felled and that the same be forthwith felled and removed out of the wood, but not disposed of without further orders. 
05-Aug
1709

Mr Kingsford on behalf of William Hammond Esq. our present tenant of Combe farm in Kent came to treat for renewing the lease of the said farm together with the underwoods belonging to that farm which contains about 67 acres by the Hospital surveys but his same having not been formerly let with the said farm the committee thinks fit in respect of the said woods to advance the old rent of £50 per annum to £70 per annum and Mr Kingsford being acquainted therewith he proposed to give that Rent and £200 fine for an additional term of 21 years which was refused

Thomas Swaine proposes £60 per annum Rent and £300 fine and 5 guineas to the poor box for the said Estate farm and woods for a lease of 21 years from expiration of his old lease which was likewise refused. And the letting of this farms underwood to be deferred for some time longer. 
25-Aug
1709

Resolved that Said William Honeywood shall have his yearly allowance of underwood assigned out of the woods in Hastingleigh and not out of the woods in Combe.
14-Dec
1709

..And we have agreed with Thomas Swaine of Lyminge in the County of Kent Yeoman to grant him a lease of the demesne of the Manors of Combe Grove and Fanscombe with the appurtenances commonly called Combe Farm in the Parishes of Wye and Hastingleigh or one of them in the said County of Kent now of late in the tenant of Thomas Combe the undertenant of William Hamond Esq by whom the said ..missed are now held by lease expiring at Michaelmas 1710 at Fifty pounds per annum rent and also of the underwoods belonging to the said farms containing by estimation Sixty Seven acres or thereabouts which were not put with the said farm for the term of One and Twenty years to commence from the expiration of that seal at the yearly rent of Sixty pounds payable quarterly in consideration of Six Guineas given to the poor box and a fine of Three Hundred pounds whereof One Hundred pounds is to be paid at Lady [day] next, One Hundred pounds more at midsummer and the remaining One Hundred pounds at Michaelmas next, under several special exceptions, provisos and agreements relating to the said farm and wood beside the usual and ordinary covenants , All which nevertheless we humbly submit to the grave judgment of this Worshipful court. 
20-Dec
1709
Minutes of last Grand Comittee read and approved
Thomas Swaine proposes as he did the Fifth of August last
Vizt: Three Hundred Pounds Fine and Sixty pounds per annum rent for Combe farm and woods for 21 years from Michaelmas 1710.
and six guineas to the poor box.
And being desired to withdraw Mr. Treasurer acquainted the committee that he had received a proposal for the said farm and woods from Sir William Honeywood and that one Mr Crayker had yesterday told Mr Treasurer that a friend of his in Kent would make a proposal for the said farm and woods and that Mr Elgar desired him if he had any proposal to make he would attend at this committee this day it being intended to let the same at this committee and likewise that he had received an account that one Mr Wade of Ashford desired to treat for the same whereapon this committee considering the whole matter and having called for the said Mr Cragher but neither he nor any for him now attending and the said Swaines having made a journey on purpose out of Kent and the lease being within less than a year of expiring and his proposal being th best which hath been yet made: The said Swaine was called in again and the committee agreed to grant him a lease of the said farms and woods upon the terms above proposed and the conditions [.......]
Vizt. That all tinber and timber trees shall be excepted for the use of the Hospital:That the downs shall be laid down from ploughing within the first seven years and not afterwards ploughed on penalty of three pounds per acre.
The woods are not to be felled above One third part in any due year and none under thirteen years or above sixteen years growth Notice of every fall of underwood to be given to the Governors at the least three months to the end that the Governors may appoint some person to take care of the timbers and that sufficient storers, standills and wavers be left according to the statutes and customs of the Country under penalty of 40 Shillings for every acre of the underwood which shall be felled without such notice
That all the dung soil and compost arising on the farm shall be spent thereon and none carried off under penalty of 10 shillings per load
That the timber for repairs and boot shall be taken by assignment but not otherwise. And all usual and customary covenants and that the said fine of three hundred pounds shall be paid as follows vizt: £100 at Lady Day next £100 at Midsummer next and the remaining £100 at Michaelmas next.
He paid six guineas to the poor box.
 
05-May
1710

Ordered that said William Honeywood be allowed the underwood in Hurst wood in Hastingleigh near Kings Mill Down on account of his 2 acres of underwood granted him yearly by his lease of which six acres and one rood was due to him at Michaelmas 1708: He is to preserve all the timber trees and standers and wavers according to custom of the county and statutes and to make good fences to preserve the springs.

And he referred to Mr Mount to see what timber may be fit to be felled and the wood to be measured and fenced and Mr Elgar is desired to appoint Courts to be held at Hastingleigh and Combe when his Bale(?) shall be proper and Mr Styser and such other governors as Mr Elgar shall think fit are desired to go with him. 
20-Nov
1710

Committee meeting notes
Whereas Thomas Swaine our tenant of Combe farm in Kent hath undertaken to new floor the barn and the parlor of the dwelling house there, and make a chimney therein and sufficiently to repair all the rest of the floors in the said house, we thereupon desired Mr. Mount's brother to set our such Oak Trees in or about the said farm not exceeding five (towards the having thereof) as he should think proper, and also we agreed to allow the said (Mr.)Swaine towards the charge thereof as soon as the same shall be done, five pounds.
20-Nov
1710

Committee meeting notes
Mr, Swaine our tenant of the demesnes of the manors of Combe Grove and Fanscombe in Kent and several others tenant or subtenants of the demesnes of the other manors belonging to this Hospital having applied for deputations to preserve the Game within the said respective manors according to the late Acts of Parliament, that they may thereby be the better enabled to present the damage done to their fences and grounds we have ordered deputations to be made out under the Common Seal of this Hospital with usual powers to be contained therein at the charge of such of our Tenants or Subtenants as shall desire the same to continue during the pleasure of this Court or the Grand Committee of this Hospital.
20-Nov
1710

Committee meeting notes
We referred it to Mr. Mount to set out two Oak Trees not exceeding together Forty Foot growing in the hedges or worsted of the demesnes of the manors of Combe Grove and Fanscombe in Kent for the use of the Parishioners of Crundale in which Parish some part of the said demesnes lie, towards the repairing the steeple of the Parish Church of Crundale which was lately blown down.
15-May
1713

The committee was informed that Sir William Honeywood lets our farms at Hastingleigh and Aldelose at £76 per annum and to Mr Crux and the underwoods (which are about 27 acres) belong to the Hospital and Mr Treasurer acquainted the committee that Sir William Honeywood had lately proposed to renew his lease of the said farm at Hastingleigh and Aldelose (which expires at Michaelmas 1713) and to give £250 fine for an additional 21 years at the old rent of £30 per annum but he insists to have the woods included in this [.....]
And it appearing by information as above that Said William Honeywood lets the said farm for £76 per annum without the woods and that £465 was formerly paid for the fine for this estate without the said woods. This committee is of the opinion that the said offer is much short of the value and therefore absolutely refuses the same and orders that Sir William be acquainted therewith and that if he does not forthwith make a much better offer, the committee will publish the same to be let to the best bidder./
And it is the opinion of the committee that the woods shall be hereafter let with the said farm and that the old rent of £50 per annum and paid before the present lease to Sir William shall be reserved again upon the next lease, And that besides the usual covenants the tenant shall be obliged to leave 20 acres of fallow ploughed in before the end of July in th last year of his lease of such land as had been usually sowed with wheat and shall be restrained from breaking up of ploughing the Downs and be obliged to fell the underwoods according to the covenants in the lease to Mr Swaine of Combe Farm there next adjoining. 
08-Jun
1713

We have agreed with John Sankey junior to grant him a lease of the Demesnes of the Manor of Hastingleigh and Aldelose in the county of Kent lately held by Sir William Honeywood Bart.
And also of the underwoods belonging to the said Manors for 21 years from Michaelmas 1713 at the yearly rent of £50 in consideration of a fine of £200 whereof £50 was to be paid in Fourteen days £50 more at Michaelmas 1714 and the remaining £100 at Michaelmas 1715:
The Hospital is to be at the charge of building a New Brew House and Granary But the rest of the buildings are to be taken in the condition they are left by the said Sir William Honeywood.
We have ordered that in the said lease to be granted to the said Mr Sankey there be inserted a particular accompt of the present growths of the said underwoods and that the like be inserted in all other leases made of any of the underwoods belonging to this Hospital. 
30-Jul
1713

Messers Janeway and Downes report of repairs wanting at Sir William Honeywood's farm at Hastingleigh was read. The consideration whereof is deferred till Mr Mount comes to town.
07-Oct
1713

Agreed and ordered that in the lease granted to Mr John Sankey junior of the demesne of the Manor of Hastingleigh and Aldelose in the County of Kent their be inserted a particular accompt of the present growth of the underwood and that the like be inserted in all other leases to be made of any of the underwood belonging to this Hospital.
10-Feb
1718

Mr John Sanke [Sankey]
By virtue of a letter of attorney from the Governors of St. Thomas Hospital to me, I hereby appoint you to collect all the quit rents payable to their manors of Hastingleigh and Aldelose in Kent, and to give acquittances for what you receive, And upon nonpayment to make distresses for the same, giving an accompt from time to time to me of what you do therein.
I am your friend and servant William Cole Treasurer
St Thomas Hospital in Southwark

To Mr John Sanke at Hastingleigh Court Lodge, to be left at the Mermaid in Canterbury.

The like sent same day to Mrs Anne Swaine for the Manors of Combe Grove and Fanscombe. 
09-Dec
1719

We have purchased of Mrs Ann Taylor and her son Thomas Taylor a small freehold farm of Ten Pounds per annum now or late in possession of William Smead lying at Hastingleigh in Kent adjoining to our other estate there in lease to Mr Swaine for two hundred pounds which has been paid out of the money given to this hospital by Mr John Rand's will and appointed by his will to be laid out in the purchase of freehold lands.
22-Nov
1721

It is referred to Mr Mount to settle an agreement with Mrs Swaine our tenant at Combe in Kent for a lease of the small farm lately purchased by this Hospital of Mrs Taylor and her son, lying at Hastingleigh.
Mr Treasurer acquainted the committee that Courts were held at Hastingleigh and Combe aforesaid in August last by him and Mr Kenrick and Mr Mount. 
21-Feb
1727

Mr. Sankey
I have wrote to Mr. Knock, if he finds your demands for a ton of timber reasonable, to mark it out for you, I find you had 30 last assigned you last April.
Your humble servant
Samuel Lesingham
Treasurer of St. Thomas' Hospital
15-Sep
1727

Grand Committee Friday - Minutes of the last Grand Committee of the 7th of September instant were read and approved. Ordered that a person be appointed by Mr Treasurer To inspect the farms at Hastingleigh and Combe Farms in Kent and to give a true state thereof which Mr Treasurer is desired to lay before the Grand Committee. 
11-Mar
1728

Sir
I wrote you some time since ago desiring you to be informed The Treasurer what you could learn concerning any payments made of the quit rents of 4 shillings 9 pence for Fanscomb field and 3 pence for 2 acres called the Reed.
Pray likewise write to him when you last received 11d of it bar [... ] for 7 acres in Wye and also 3d for 2 acres called Great Fanscombe or JlubDown
I am your humble servant
R.K.
Sent to Mr Swain by Mr Gourely 
24-Jul
1728

The President acquainted the Court that the Grand Committee had treated with George Scott Esq. For purchase of an estate of the said Mr Scott of about £190 and lying near this Hospitals estate at Hastingleigh and Comb in Kent and had come to an agreement for the same the said Mr Scott making a good [Fille?] and that Mr Horseman being advised with had thought it unnecessary to have a decree of the court of chancery
-obtained in order to obviate the difficulties that appeared to him and thereupon he said parties were proceeding in order to procure such decree.
[N.B. This is later identified to be a property on the Brabourn border with Hastingleigh]
 
no date
1729

We have agreed with Nicholas Swain to grant him a lease of the sites of the Manors of Comb Grove and Fanscomb In Kent with the farms and lands thereto belonging and also a small farm there called Smeads farm for a term of One and Twenty years from Michaelmas 1731 at the yearly rent of £86 tax free in consideration of a fine of £200 under the covenants of the present lease thereof and such other covenants as shall be thought proper by this Grand Committee.
The underwoods are not to cut under the growth of 13 or above 15 years and the tenant is to preserve Fillers in the hedgerows and keep the shaws about the house only fenced. 
10-Mar
1729

Agreed with Nicholas Swaine to let him
A lease of the sites of the Manors of Comb Grove and Fanscombe in Kent with the Farm and lands thereto belonging and also the small farm called Smead Farm for 21 years from Michaelmas 1731 at £86 per annum clear rent and £200 fine £100 to be paid at midsummer next and the residue at midsummer 1731 upon the covenants of the present lease and such other covenants as shall be thought proper by the Grand Committee the underwoods not to be cut under 13 of more than 15 years growth and to preserve tillers in hedgerows and the shaws about the house to be kept duly fenced.
5 guineas to the poor box. 
26-Mar
1729

Minutes of last Grand Committee held the 21st instant read and approved
Mr Pemberton attended the committee and acquainted them that Mr George Scott with whom there had been a treaty for purchase of the Manor of Brabourne and other estate near Hastingleigh in Kent is dead and proposed to renew the said treaty.
It is referred to the committee formerly appointed to treat for the said estate to proceed therein as they shall find advisable and Mr Thornhill and Mr Ruck are added to the said committee. 
1730
1730

We have ordered thirty oak trees on our farm at Hastingleigh in Kent to be felled and sold.
13-Sep
1735

Mr. Gourly
Mr. Swain of Hastingleigh has sent notice that he intends to fell Coney Wood and the upper part of Hares Spring & Hayns Sheave between Michaelmas and Christmas next. You are therefore desired to take care of the Timber growing and to mark all such storers, wavers saplings and tillers are proper to be left. He is restrained from cutting above one third part of the underwood in any one year and to cut none under thirteen years growth or above fifteen. Let me know what timber trees are now in the above mentioned woods.
I am yours etc
Signed by the Treasurer
04-Nov
1735

Mr. Gourly,
Mr. Treasurer wrote you the 13th of September last that Mr. Swaine of Hastingleigh had sent notice of felling underwood and desired your answer to his letter, but has not received any. Mr. Sankey has sent notice that he designs to fell 2 Acres and a half of underwood of Kings Mill Down Wood, pray take care of the timber growing, and mark all such storers, wavers, saplings or tillers as are proper to be left, and let Mr. Treasurer have an answer to his letter and the reason of your delay, the sooner the better
Yours etc
G.G.
To Mr. Gourly at Molash
near Ashford Kent.
07-Nov
1733

Agreed with John Sankey the present tenant of Court Lodge Farm Hastingleigh to let him a lease of that farm for 21 years from the expiration of the present lease at £60 per annum clear rent and £250 fine
3 guineas to poor box
 
19-Mar
1736

Mr Gourly
I have received a letter and bill from you whereby you demand money for 5 years past at such a rate. Pray when was that agreement made and when was you paid?
A man that does business in such a manner gives an account from time to time to his employer, but I have had no such account and if you have been at Combgrove and Court Lodge farms to mark out Tillers or timber for repairs you must be paid for your trouble, but I don't understand what you mean by pretending to so many years at so much by the year.
I am etc
Signed by Mr Treasurer
To Mr Thomas Gourley at Molash near Ashford, Kent
 
19-Mar
1736

Mr Sankey
Today I read your letter of the 15th instant telling me that Gourly had been now and then at that farm but could not tell how often you ask for Timber for repairs but don't tell for what, so that I cannot answer anything to that matter
Your loving friend
C.J.
To Mr John Sankey
 
21-Feb
1737

Mr. Knock,
Mr. Sankey writes me he wants a ton of timber to repair his house, barns etc., I desire you will go over and see what occasion he can have for such a quantity and if you find it necessary to let him have it, but hope you will be careful to cut down nothing but what is proper to be felled, pray let me know by letter what you do
S.L.
P.S. I refer you to Mr. Matthew's letter of 24th. December last about disposing the ash in Swain?s and Sankey's Farm.
02-Apr
1737

Mr. Knock,
Mr. Sankey writes me that he wants thirty foot of oak timber for some necessary repairs I desire you to see and mark out that quantity it you find his demands proper and let me know by a line what you do therein.
I am etc
C.L.
02-Apr
1737

Mr. Sankey,
You will see I have wrote Mr. Knock to mark you out 30 foot of Oak timber if he finds your demands proper.
I am etc
C.L.
03-May
1737

Mr. Swaine,
Mr. Knock writes me he has marked 19 trees as sufficient for the repairs, which you may take down I hope he has not marked any thriving ones.
I am etc Sir
Signed by the Treasurer
10-Sep
1737
Mr Knock
Mr Swaine of Hastingleigh has sent notice that he intends to fell the lower part of Richard's Wood between Michaelmas and Christmas next. You are therefore desired by Mr Treasurer to take care of the Timber growing and to mark all such storers, wavers, saplings or tillers as are proper to be left.
He is restrained from cutting above one third part of the underwood in any one year and to cut none under 13 years growth or above 15.
Yours etc
J. Wright. 
02-Dec
1737

Mr. Swaine,
The bearer Mr. Knock has been here and complains of your refusing to pay him for his trouble and charges of two journeys to London which were at your request, to represent to the Governors what repairs you was in want to have done, and afterward to bring up the account of the charges. I think you have no reason to dispute paying him if you consider how much favour you obtained of the Hospital and therefore hope you will not delay paying him.
I am etc
Signed by Mr. Treasurer.
To Mr. Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh, Kent
24-Dec
1737

Mr. Knock,
I am sorry to tell you that our good Treasurer Mr. Joye died last Tuesday night but you may go on to dispose of the 52 ash trees you mention on Mr. Swain's farm and the hundred feet of ash on Mr. Sankeys farm as will be of most advantage to the Hospital so that the season may not be lost if you have any occasion to write about the Hospital business you may for the present send to me who am
Your friend and servant
Thomas Matthew
To Mr. Knock at Chilham, near Canterbury.
30-Sep
1738

Mr. Knock,
Mr. Swaine of Hastingleigh has sent notice that he intends to fell Earmons Sheave & the lower part of Hards springs between this and Christmas next you are therefore desired to take care of the timber growing and to mark all such storers, wavers or tillers as are proper to be left. He is restrained from cutting above one third part of the underwood in any one year and to cut none under thirteen years growth or above fifteen. If you observe any trees to have done thriving and grow stag headed, Mr. Treasurer would have them felled and let him have an account thereof
You'll please to remember the money that is due for the ash you sold and order payment thereof
I am etc
G.Green
30-Oct
1740

Mr. Knock,
Mr. Sankey has sent notice that he designs to fell Beake Wood or part of it this year, with which Mr. Treasurer has ordered you should be acquainted, and would have you take care to mark all tillers and other growing timber trees as are fit to be preserved you had an account in March last, that Mr. Swaine and Mr. Sankey wanted timber for repairs, which you was desired to mark out for them, and to let Mr. Treasurer know for what repairs, and how much you allotted each; of which you have not as yet taken any notice
I am etc
Jn Wright
At Chilham near Canterbury
09-Apr
1741

Mr. Knock,
Mr. Sankey writes that he wants some timber for repairs, and Mrs. Treasurer desires you will mark what timber is necessary for him.
I am etc
J. Wright
at Chilham near Canterbury
26-Sep
1741

Mr. Knock,
Mr. Swaine has wrote to Mr. Treasurer to acquaint him, that he intends to fell the upper part of Richard's Wood between Michaelmas and Christmas next. You are desired to make out what is proper to be left standing, and to use your utmost care in the preservation of the growing timber trees for the service of the Hospital
I am etc
J. Wright
at Chilham near Canterbury
09-Apr
1741

Mr Sankey
I received your of the 20th March last and according to your direction therein have returned the Bill you sent the 21st February last drawn by John Weller or John Weeks for £60 payable 6 days after dates, Mr Weeks refusing to pay the Bill for that he had not sold the Hops Mr Weller sent him, and advised you in my last.
I am etc
J. Wright
Mr Sankey at Hastingleigh, to be left at the Mermaid in Canterbury. 
10-Aug
1742

Mr Swaine
Mr Treasurer received yours of this date with a Bill inclosed for £19.5.4 on Mr Edward Ludlow/Ludlow which is accepted and when paid will discharge the years rent due at Michaelmas 1741
I am etc
J. Wright.
Mr Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh
By the Ashford Bag
 
28-Jan
1743

Mr Knock
Mr Swaine has wrote to Mr Treasurer that he wants about a Ten and half of Timber to repair a post and rail fence. You are desired to mark out what may be proper and necessary for him
I am etc
R.R.
To Mr Knock at Chilham
near Canterbury
 
Feb
1743

Mr Knock
I received apt. letter and think Mr Swaine should have given me notice that he wanted a new Floor for his Stable, however as it is done by your directions and so much timber saved by doing it in that manner the 40shillings shall be allowed him, and if those beech trees have done growing, I would have you cut them down and sell them,
I have likewise considered your trouble in looking after the Woods, and as you was well recommended, and I have a good opinions of you, I desire Mr Swaine will pay you two Guineas, which I hope will satisfy you
and that you will do what in you lies, whenever there is a falling, to preserve the timber .
I am etc
signed by Mr Treasurer
 
00-May
1743

Mr. Knock,
Mr. Sankey has wrote that he wants some timber for repairs, Mr. Treasurer directs you will let him have what is necessary for it and by a letter inform him what you have done
To Mr. Knock
at Chilham near Canterbury
I am etc
R. Rowney
To Mr. Knock at Chilham near Canterbury
06-Oct
1743

Mr. Knock,
Mr. Swaine has given notice that he intends to fall the upper parts of Gillnash and Culverhill Woods between this Michaelmas and Christmas Mr. Treasurer's order is that you take care to mark what is usual and fit to be left standing, and of the growing timber trees.
I am your etc
C.W.
At Chilham near Canterbury
10-Dec
1743

Mr Swaine
Mr Treasurer received your of the 5th inst and by his order I am to acquaint you that Mr Evans has this day paid your account £26.18.6 for which I gave him a receipt.
The Bag End of Hops which the Hospital bought of you in June last, now paid for to Mr Isaac Jones the factor, the weight at 4stones 16 ounces at £46 per hundredweight , came to £9.10.6 and Cartage.
They did not prove so good as was expected and the last parcel you would have sold to the Hospital was not liked at any price.
I am etc
J.W
To Hastingleigh,
by the Ashford Bag, Kent. 
19-Feb
1744

Mr Knock
Mr Sankey has wrote to Mr Treasurer desiring that some timber might be ordered him for a Barn Floor which, he says, has not been new laid for 31 years past, and that this is the best time for cutting down timber for that use. Mr Treasurer therefore desires that you will inform yourself of the particulars, and after you have directed proper timber for that purpose, that you will immediately give an account thereof to him.
J.W.
At Chilham near Canterbury
 
29-Mar
1744

Mr Knock
Mr Sankey has desired that some timber may be ordered him for repairs, Mr Treasurer would have you see what is necessary to be done and when you have marked out what is proper to let him know what quantity and for what use you have assigned it.
Yours
J.W.
At Chilham near Canterbury
 
15-Aug
1744

Mr Swaine
It is now almost two months since Mr Treasurer received yours of the 25th of June last signifying your having ordered £54.19.6 to be paid here on your account. I have present to Mr. Thornet on several times, who declares he has not received the money, Mr. Treasurer therefore hopes you will write to your correspondent at Canterbury to know the reason why the money was not remitted in time, and that you will take care to have it paid here forthwith.
J.W.
At Hastingleigh to be left at the Flying Horse at Wye Kent
by the Ashford Bag. 
11-Oct
1744

Mr Knock
Mr Swaine having sent notice that he intends to fell the lower part of Culverhill Wood between this and Christmas next; Mr: Treasurer desires you will take care of the growing timber and mark all such storers, saplings etc as are proper to be left standing
J.W.
at Chiham near Canterbury
 
18-Apr
1745

Mr Sankey
According to yours of the 30th last, I sent to Mr.Hatherill for the year's rent, whose answer was that he would pay it in a week's time, which was last Thursday, if he had sold the Wool; but hearing nothing further from him, Mr. Treasurer has ordered me to acquaint you therewith, that it is not yet paid.
I am etc
J.W.
To he left at the Mermaid in Canterbury
 
14-May
1745

Mr Knock
Mr Treasurer has seen your letter of the 11th inst and has ordered me to acquaint you that if the 8 or 10 Beeches you mention, one decaying, he would have you sell them to the best advantage. Mr Treasurer would likewise have given orders for paying you for your trouble, but as you charge for 4 Journeys, and there appear by our book of orders but 3, he desires to know your demand upon the Hospital and will direct the payment of it forthwith.
J.W.
At Chilham near Canterbury
 
23-May
1745

Mr Knock
In Mr Treasurer's absence your letter of the 20th inst. came to my hands, in which I find you have sold the Ten Beeches to Mr Swaine for Five shillings a tree, whereas you wrote in your former letter that you thought they might be worth 3 or 4 Pounds, however since you say they were scrubbed and fit only for the fire and that you have sold them for their full value, I doubt not of Mr. Treasurer's approbation of what you have done, who before he went out of Town gave me orders to write to Mr. Swaine to pay you which I desire he will do, and let me hear from him about his rent very soon, because the accounts are to be examined the beginning of next Month.
J.W. 
20-Jul
1745
Mr Swaine
You sent word by yours of the 29th of June last that you had ordered Mr Robert Nye of Canterbury to pay here £30 in a weeks time but having waited for him near 3 weeks I thought it was time to let you know that the money is not paid yet of which you will take notice and direct the payment of it forthwith.
J.W.
At Hastingleigh to be left at the Flying Horse at Wye in Kent
by Ashford Bag. 
06-Nov
1746

Mr Sankey
Mr Treasurer received yours of the 31st October last and by the underwritten you will perceive what prders Mr Knock has concerning you which you will convey to him by the first opportunity.
I am etc
J.W.
For Mr Sankey at Hastingleigh to be left at the Mermaid in Canterbury

Mr Nock
Mr Treasurer has received notice from Mr Sankey that he intends to fell this year Lynn wood containing about 3 acres and that he wants some timber for repairs and you are therefore desired to mark such storers etc as is customary in order to preserve the growing timber, trees and likewise to assign Mr Sankey what timber his necessary repairs require.
J.W. 
no date
1747

I am very sorry to acquaint you that the News of Mr. Swayne's death is too true
 
01-Oct
1747

Mr Swain
Yours of the 21st September was laid before Mr Treasurer who has ordered me to acquaint you that he expects you to pay a year's rent very soon-You will show Mr Knock the following directory
Yours etc
J.W.


Mr Knock
Mr Swaine having sent Notice that he intends to fall Hearst Wood between this and Christmas Mr Treasurer desires you will take care of the Timber and mark all storers, wavers etc as are proper to be left standing according to Customs
Yours etc
J.W.
Mr Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh
To be left at the Flying Horse at Wye Kent by the Ashford Bag
 
19-Dec
1747

Mr. Sankey
Mr. Treasurer received yours of the 4th inst and has ordered me to send the following to Mr Knock
Yours etc
J.W.

Mr Hock
Mr. Sankey writes that he shall have occasion for some timber for repairs this year. Mr Treasurer desires you will see what repairs are necessary to be done, and let him know what timber will be wanted that he may give you further orders.
Yours etc
J.W.
For Mr. Sankey at Hastingleigh to be left at the Mermaid Canterbury
 
29-Dec
1747

Mr Sankey
Mr. Treasurer received yours of yesterday and has seen Mr Knocks letter giving an account of his very ill state of health and recommending Mr Thomas Braybrook a carpenter of Wye as a proper person to succeed him. Mr Treasurer therefore desires you will let Mr Braybrook know that he may take a view of your farm and inform him what repairs are wanting and what timber is necessary.
J.W. 
08-Nov
1748

Mr Swaine
Yours of the 7th inst. with notice of your intention to fell that further can(?) of Gillnash wood came this day, and Mr Treasurer desires you will send to Mr Thomas Braybrook a carpenter of Wye whom Mr Knock recommended last year to be woodreeve in his stead and let him mark such storers and wavers and other growing timber trees as are proper to be left standing and according to the custom of the country and that he is to send up an account of what he does for the Hospital directed to Anthony Walburge esq. Treasurer of St. Thomas Hospital.
J.W. 
08-Dec
1748

Mr Sankey
Yours of 29th October last giving notices of your intention to fell 2 or 3 acres of Kingmill Down wood has been laid before Mr Treasurer whose order is that Mr Braybrook of Wye should mark such storers and waver such as are proper to be left standing and according to the customs of the County And at the same time order what Timber is necessary for you repairs of which he is desired to give Mr Treasurer an account by directing to Anthony Welburge Esq. Treasurer of St. Thomas Hospital
L.W. 
15-Dec
1748

Mr. Swaine
The Bill on Messrs. Grant and Barlow for £43.1.4 is paid and the £43 placed to your account in discharge of the half years rent due at Michaelmas 1747 Mr Braybrook in his letter of 26 November last acquaints Mr Treasurer that on the 17th he had marked out for your uses Two ton of oak timber but as he did it within orders and without your applying for any, Mr Treasurer would know how so great a quantity came to be marked out without leave and for what particular repairs it is wanted.
J.W. 
01-Mar
1749

Mr. Sankey
Mr. Treasurer received yours of 24th last with a Bill inclosed on John Mackrill for £60.1.4 which Mr. Mackrill has accepted, not withstanding you had omitted to endorse it and when paid I will give you credit for the years rent due at Michaelmas last
I am sir yours etc
J.W.
at Hastingleigh to be left at
the Mermaid Canterbury
 
15-Apr
1749

Sir,
Yours of the 10th inst with a bill inclosed for £86.1.4 came to hand this day which is left for acceptance and when paid shall be placed to your account of rent.
Yours etc
J.W.
For Mr Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh
To be left at the Flying Horse at Wye, Kent
By Ashford bag. 
12-Oct
1749

Mr. Swaine
Your notice of the 28th September last of your intention to fell the lower part of Richards Wood and Coney wood between Michaelmas and Christmas next hath been laid before William Mount, our present Treasurer, who hath ordered me to acquaint you that he hath appointed Mr John Chatbourn of Hastingleigh (the bearer hereof) to be the Hospital woodreeve instead of Mr Braybrook whom Mr Treasurer desires you will pay for his trouble in proportion to what Mr Knock was allowed, which was 5 shillings a journey and it appears by my letters to yourself and Mr Sankey that Mr Braybrook hath 3 journeys since his appointment.
I am etc
J.W.
to Mr. Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh 
14-Nov
1749

Sir,
Mr. Treasurer received your's of the 10th inst. and has ordered me to acquaint you that he does not at this time insist on it that Mr. Swaine shall not cut that part of Richard's wood which he intended for want of a year's growth but expects for the future that he observes the covenants of his Lease Mr. Treasurer however approves of your forbidding Mr. Sankey from topping or lopping any more pollards than according to the terms of his lease he can justify.
I am etc.
J. W.
To Mr. John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh Kent
 
09-Jan
1750

Mr. Chatbourn
Mr. Treasurer received yours relating to Mr Sankey's repairs and desires you will mark out so much timber as you judge will be wanted for such repairs as are necessary for the present, and the rest will be ordered when the Governors come down next Summer.
J.W.
To Mr. John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh, Kent. 
23-Jan
1750

Mr. Chatbourn
Mr. Swaine in his Letter of the 14th December last applied to Mr Treasurer for timber to be marked out for joists for the barn floor and for laths for Smeeds Barns which he intends to thatch next summer for the last time and says that timber for the planks of the barn may be felled upon the farm without damage to it.
In answer to which he was told that you would have directions about it in convenient time and you are now accordingly desired to examine carefully into the affair and let Mr. Treasurer know what is necessary and fit to be done in order to your receiving further instructions
To Mr. John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh, Kent .
Yours etc
J.Wright
 
18-Jul
1750

We have likewise had a view taken of our two farms at Hastingleigh near Wye in Kent the leases of which are near expiring.
18-Jul
1750

We have granted leases to the following persons Vizt:
To Nicholas Swaine a lease of Comb Farm in the Parish of Hastingleigh in Kent for 21 years from Michaelmas 1752 (when his present lease will expire) at a clear Rent of £86 and a fine of £200
 
18-Aug
1750

Mr. Swaine,
I received yours this day with a bill inclosed for £83.1.4 which is accepted and when paid shall he placed to your accounts for the discharge of one year?s rent due at Lady day last.
J.W.
To Mr Nicholas Swains at Hastinghleigh near Wye, Kent 
30-Aug
1750

Mr Swaine
Mr. Treasurer has ordered me to acquaint you that a Grand Committee of the Governors will be held on Tuesday the 11th of September next at 11 o'clock at which time you are desired to attend with your proposal for receiving the lease you are likewise desired to let Mr Sankey know that the Governors have deferred treating with him till within three years of the expiration of his lease that being the usual method of this Hospital.
The bill was paid the 22nd inst
J.W. 
30-Oct
1750

Mr. Chatbourn
Mr. Swaine has given Notice that he intends to fell this falling time the wood against Mr. Sankey's wood and the shaws round the stocks Mr. Treasurer desires you will take Care that the timber trees be preserved and to mark against this fall so many storers, waves etc. as are proper and declared to customer to be left standing.
Yours
J. W.
To Mr. John Chatbourn at Hastingliegh near Wye Kent
by Ashford Bag
 
08-Nov
1750

Sir,
On Mr Treasurer's coming to town your Letter of the 13th. of October last was laid before him wherein you relate the death of Thomas Stickles one of the freehold tenants of the two cottages in the Manor of Hastingleigh for which two Heriots are due to this Hospital, But as you represent that he has left a Wife and five small Children in low circumstance and only one Cow and Pig of live Stock on the Premises. Mr Treasurer has ordered me to acquaint you that the Governors are willing to show so much regard to the distresses of the Family as is consistent with preserving the Rights of this Hospital. In order to which you are desired to make the customary seizure and then compound with the widow for some small Consideration on the Heriots being returned here
Yours etc J.W.
For Mr John Sankey at Hastingleigh
to be left at the Mermaid in Canterbury 
29-Dec
1750

Mr Swaine
I received yours of 14th inst containing your request for timber to be marked out for joists and planks for the Barn floor for Laths for Smeed Farm in to which Mr Treasurer has ordered me to send for answers That he will give Mr Chatbourne directions about it in convenient time
I remain yours etc
J.W.
At Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
 
06-Apr
1751

Mr Chatbourn
Mr Treasurer received yours of the 29th of last month giving an account of what timber you had marked for repairs for Mr Sankey and Mr Swaine which Mr Treasurer approves of and desires you will take care no more timber be felled that what you have marked nor more than is necessary.
J. Wright
To Mr John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh, Kent
 
03-Aug
1751

Mr. Swaine
I received yours of the 30th last with the Bill inclosed for £64.0.11 which is accepted and when paid shall be placed to your account of rent.
Your notice that you intend to fell, at next falling time, Earman's Shawe or Wood has been laid before Mr.Treasurer and likewise your request of the 6 or 7 Beech Trees in that wood which you say are of no great value and damages the underwood - about which I am orderd to write to Mr. Chatbourn our Woodreeve by this Post
Yours etc
J.Wright
To Mr. Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent 
03-Aug
1751

Mr. Chatbourn
Mr. Swaine has given notice that he intends to fall at next Felling time Earman's Shaw or wood is at which time please would have you take care to preserve the growing timber trees, and mark the storers and wavers as are proper to be left standing according to the customs of the Country and to take as view of 6 or 7 Beech trees standing in the said wood which Mr Swaine has desired Mr. Treasurer to give him as being of small value and damaging the Underwood which if you find to be the case Mr. Treasurer consents to Mr Swaine's taking them on condition of his planting as many Ashen Trees in the Hedges Rows in their stead
Yours etc
J.Wright
To Mr John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh near Wye by Ashford Bag
 
08-Oct
1751

Mr Chatbourn
Sir,
Mr. Sankey has sent Mr. Treasurer notice that he intends to fall Two Acres and half of Wood in Kings Mill Down you are desired to take care of the growing Timber and to mark such storers and wavers as are proper to be left Standing according to Custom
 
12-Nov
1751

Mr Chatbourn
Mr. Treasurer was informed by Mr Swaine that the Beech trees were of very small value whereas by your account of the 8th inst. they contain 93 Ft. which at the common Price of 8d per foot are worth £3.2.0 but Mr. Treasurer being willing to do Mr Swaine a favour, consents to his having the nine trees at 6d per foot. I have just now received a Letter from Mr Swaine of the 11th inst. giving notice of his intention to fell about half an acre of wood that lies in the middle of a wood belonging to Mr Upton of Canterbury now felling and of which he says he had no notice till last Week.
You are desired to enquire into this affair and to do what is requisite for the interest of the Hospital.
J. Wright
To Mr John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh near Wye by Ashford Bag
 
07-Jan
1752

Mr. Sankey
Mr. Treasurer received yours of the 4th inst with a Bill inclosed for £60.1.4 which is accepted, and when paid shall be placed to your account in discharge of the year's rent due at Michaelmas last. Yours etc
J.Wright
For Mr John Sankey, Hastingleigh
to be left at the Mermaid at Canterbury 
Jan
1752

Wrote to Mr. Chatbourn of Hastingleigh that Mr Treasurer had paid the £2.6.6 for the 93 feet of Beech sold to Mr Swaine in November last at 6d per foot and that Mr. Chatbourn was to take the Money of Mr Swaine
J. Wright
 
21-Jan
1752

Sir,
Mr Treasurer received yours of 18th inst. and is surprised at your wanting Timber for repairs so soon after the last order, which was but last spring Therefore you are desired to speak to Mr Chatbourn our woodreeve in order to examine the condition of the poles and gates for which you say the timber is wanted, and to acquaint Mr Treasurer therewith as also for what uses the elm you mention is intended for, and to what particular purpose the last timber was applied
J .Wright
To Mr. John Sankey at Hastingleigh
to be left at the Mermaid at Canterbury 
15-Feb
1752

Mr Chatbourn
Yours of the 22nd inst. came to hand yesterday and Mr Treasurer orders is to mark out for Mr Sankey what timber is necessary for the repairs, to be done in that manner proposed in your letter, since you are both agreed that it is the best method and will require less Timber you will let Mr Treasurer know what quantity of timber you have allowed Mr Sankey when you have marked it out
I am etc
J Wright
To Mr John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh near Wye, Kent
by Ashford Bag 
15-Feb
1752

Mr Chatbourn
Yours of the 22nd inst. came to hand yesterday and Mr Treasurer's order is to mark out for Mr Sankey what timber is necessary for the repairs, to be done in that Treasurer proposed in your letter, since you are both agreed that it is the best method and will require less timber you will let Mr Treasurer know what quantity of timber you have allowed Mr Sankey when you have marked it out
I am etc
J. Wright
To Mr John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
by Ashford Bog 
15-May
1752
"
Mr Swaine
Yours with a Bill for £43.0.8, came to hand yesterday, the Bill is accepted and when paid will discharge the years rent due at Christmas last
I am etc
J. Wright
To Mr Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent 
18-Oct
1752

Mr. Swaine
I received yesterday a letter from you and the notice given therein of your intention to fell at next falling time the lower part of Hardy's spring or wood and the shaw adjoining to Everton Lees [Evington Lees] has been laid before Mr Treasurer about which I am ordered to write to Mr. Chatbourn our woodreeve by this post.
Your Lease has been engrossed these six months past so that whenever you come to town the counterpart will be ready for your executing it.
I am your humble servant
R.L.
To Mr. Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
 
18-Oct
1752

Mr. Chatbourn
Mr. Swaine has given notice that he intends to fell next falling time the lower part of Hardy's spring or wood, and the shaw adjoining to Everton Lees, at which time Mr. Treasurer would have you take care to preserve the growing Timber trees, and to mark the storers, wavers, saplings and tillers, as are proper to be left Standing
I am Sir etc
R.L.
To Mr John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh near Wye by Ashford Bag 
31-Oct
1752

Mr. Chatbourn
Mr Treasurer has received notice from Mr Sankey that he intends to fell Aldelose wood and desires that such may be marked out as shall be thought proper by which it is supposed he means such trees for repairs as are proper. You are desired to mark such storers, wavers etc as are fit and so many as the customs of those woods to the Country require and to take care of the growing timbers and if any has wanting for repairs you will send word how many and for what uses.
I am Sir etc
J. Wright
To Mr. John Chatbourn etc at supra
 
11-Nov
1752

Mr. Swaine
I received yours of 7th inst. with of Bill for £77.6.6 which is accepted and when paid shall be placed to the account of your fine.
J. Wright
To Mr. Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh
near Wye Kent 
16-Nov
1752

Mr. Chatbourn
Mr. Treasurer received yours of the 8th inst. And has directed me to write you that your journeys shall be considered and desires you will explain that part of your letter where you sometimes find things not so well in the felling of the woods as you would wish and inform the tenants that it is expected that they should have as strict regard to the covenants of their leases and should give you an account how many years growth the woods are of at present.
Mr Swaine when last here told Mr Treasurer that the beech for which you received £2.6.6 as for 93 feet at 6d per foot measured no more that 68 inches.
I am etc
J.Wright
To Mr John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
By Ashford Bag. 
26-Jul
1753

Mr. Sankey
Mr. Treasurer receive yours of 23rd inst. with two Bills inclosed for £100 which are accepted and when paid shall be placed to the account of your fine and the remainder of it you will pay as soon as conveniently you can.
J.W.
For Mr. John Sankey at Hastingleigh
to be left at the Mermaid at Canterbury 
02-Aug
1753

Mr. Swaine
Your's with a Bill inclosed for £78.14 came to hand this day the Bill is accepted and when paid will, with the £6 allowed for the barn floor discharge your rent to midsummer last
J .W.
To Mr. Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent 
31-Jan
1754

Mr. Chatbourn
By Mr. Treasurer's order I am to acquaint you that Mr. Sankey has sent notice of his intention to repair his house next summer and shall want some rough timber for rafters and laths and for rails and pales you are desired therefore to inform yourself of the repairs necessary to be done there, how much and what sort of Timber if requisite and where you intend to fell it and to send an account thereof before you mark the trees that Mr Treasurer may send orders for your further proceedings therein
J.W.
To Mr. John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh near Wye
by Ashford Bag
 
16-Feb
1754

Mr. Swaine
I received yours of the 11th inst. with the bill inclosed for £21.11. which was not accepted till this day for want of advice from Mr Hudsons and when paid will discharge the remainder of your fine of £200
J. W.
To Mr. Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
 
14-Mar
1754

Mr. Chatbourn
Mr Treasurer has ordered me to write in answer to yours of the 11th inst. That he does not apprehend for what use Mr. Sankey can want more Pollards, some you have marked 5 besides ten oaks which you say are sufficient for the necessary repairs on Mr Sankey's farm but if he wants then for firing he is to be told that Mr Treasurer will never allow any pollards to be felled for that use, which near any tops fit for lopping and which are not quite decayed and unfit for any better purpose
I am likewise to acquaint you that Mr Treasurer approves of your proposal of raising some quick sell and desires you will take care that it be done.
J.W. 
13-Jul
1754


Mr. Chatbourn
Mr. Treasurer has received a letter from Mr. Sankey acquainting him that the Timber which was taken down would not afford Laths enough without great Spoil, and desiring a piece might be taken down which will do.
I am ordered to write for answers in that he would have you, for the future, send notice of the necessary repairs to be done for the tenant and what timber may be proper to be marked for this purpose as you are appointed for that service and as it will shorten the trouble of business. You are therefore desired to inform Mr Treasurer what is fit to be done on this decision that you may receive proper instruction relating thereto
J. Wright
To Mr John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh near Wye
by Ashford Bag.

 

18-Jul
1754

Mr. Chatbourn
By Mr. Treasurer's order this is to acquaint you that as you cannot judge what Quantity of Laths Mr. Sankey may want for the repairs of his house it will be more prudent to buy laths then cut down timbers to waste or you are desired to let Mr Sankey know this and to send and account of the expenses thereof.
J.Wright
To Mr John Chatbourn at .... 
05-Sep
1754

Mr. Swaine
Yours with a bill for £43 and 8 came to hand the 2nd inst. And the bill was accepted yesterday and when paid shall be placed to your account of rent.
You will let Mr Chatbourn know that Mr Treasurer would have him take care to mark as usual before you begin to fell this upper tract of Richard's wood next felling time according to your notice in your letter above mentioned.
J. Wright
To Mr. Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh near Wye, Kent . 
19-Dec
1754

 

Mr. Chatbourn
Mr. Sankey having given Notice that he intends to fell two Acres of Kings Mill Down Wood
Mr. Treasurer would have You take a view of it and mark such Storers and Wavers as are proper to be left standing and according to the Custom of the County.
Yours etc
J. W.
 

10-May
1755

Mr Swaine
I received yours of the 5th inst. With a bill inclosed for £43 which when paid will discharge the half year's rent due Midsummer 1754 last The Bill is accepted.
Yours
J.W.
To Mr Nicholas Swaine at Hastingleigh near Wye, Kent
Mr Swaine,
I received yours of 30th August and the Bill for £43 is accepted and when paid shall be placed to your account of rent at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
J.Wright
 
18-Oct
1755

Mr Chatbourn,
Mr Swaine has given notice that he intends next felling time to fell Redfield Ruff and Milldown Shawe all the way down to lower Richard's Dean in of which Mr. Treasurer desires you will take a view and mark the growing storers, which ought to be left standing and to see that they are so left after the fall an acquaint him therewith
Yours etc
J.Wright
To Mr John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
by Ashford bag
 
21-Oct
1755

Mr Sankey
Mr. Treasurer received yours of the 17th inst. and has ordered me to write for answer that you have agreed with Mr Stickels to take 20 for the Herriot and since as you represent it, he is likely to gain very little by the legacy left him, Mr Treasurer gives his consent to it and would have Mr Chatbourn mark such and so many storers etc in that part of Aldelose wood you intend to fell next season, as is customary etc for the preservation of the timber and to allow you what timber is necessary for the well curb and posts and rails
Yours
J.Wright
Mr John Sankey to be left at the Mermaid at Canterbury. 
01-Jan
1756

Sir
Mr. Treasurer has ordered me to acquaint you that if the repairs mentioned in your letter to be done at Mr Sankey's are really necessary in such case you are desired to let him have timber proper and sufficient for that purpose.
R. Leeson
To Mr. John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
by Ashford Bag 
07-Feb
1756

Mr Swaine
I received yours of the 4th inst. with the inclosed bill which I have returned you to set your name on the back of it. You are to acquaint Mr Chatbourn with the repairs that are wanting and when he has examined unto them he is to send Mr Treasurer an account of them and what timber is necessary that he may have orders for marking what is proper.
J.Wright
At Hastingleigh near Wye, Kent.
04-Mar
1756

Mr Chatbourn
In answer to yours of the 26th inst. Mr Treasurer has ordered me to acquaint you that he thinks Mr Swaine's demand for posts and rails are very large and therefore desires your opinion on whether so many are necessary and whether a bank would not be more proper than posts and rails for inclosing the woods and if it would not be cheaper to buy the stuff for the two hundred pales than to fell timber. Mr Treasurer therefore defers giving his final orders about these repairs till he hears from you what you judge is the most proper to be done for the service of the Hospital you may at the same time send an account what timber trees on this estate have done growing and what are fit for the purposes of these repairs I am Sir etc
J. Wright
To Mr John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh near Wye, Kent
By Ashford Bag. 
18-Mar
1756

Mr Chatbourn
In answer to yours of the 14th. Inst relating to the timber necessary for posts and rails and repairs at Mr Swaines farm, Mr Treasurer desires you will take care that no more be felled than what you mark and see that it be applied to those purposes
I am Sir etc
J.Wright
To Mr John Chatbourn at Hastingleigh near Wye in Kent
by Ashford Bag
 
14-Aug
1756

Mr Swaine
I received yesterday yours of the 9th inst. with a bill of £43 which is accepted and when paid will discharge the half years rent due at Christmas last
J.Wright
At Hastingleigh near Wye,Kent. 
12-Oct
1756

Mr Swain
Yours of the 2nd inst with notice of your intention to fell the upper part of Culverhill and Gilnash woods has been laid before Mr Treasurer who desires you will give notice to Mr Chatbourn that he may mark such storers and wavers and other growing timber trees as are proper to be left standing agreeable to the custom of the place.
I am Sir Yours etc
R. Leeson
To Mr Nicholas Swain at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
By Ashford bag. 
02-Dec
1756

Mr. Chatbourn
Mr. Treasurer desires you will mark a piece of timber of 15 feet long for the sall of the Westhouse agreeable to Mr Sankey's request and as mentioned in yours of the 26th.
Yours
J.W. 
31-Mar
1757

Mr Chatbourn
Mr. Treasurer received yours of the 27th inst. And approves of your buying Laths rather than cutting timber to make them but would have you acquaint Mr Sankey that he thinks a barn at such a distance and so much exposed in scarce worth supporting and understood by Mr Richard Mount when he took a view of it, that Mr Sankey himself was of the same opinion
I am Sir etc
J.W. 
11-Oct
1757

Mr. Swaine
Yours of the 8th inst, of your intention to fall the hither end part of Culverhill Wood next falling time has beenlaid before Mr. Treasurer you are desired to apply to the Hospital woodreve Mr Chatburn to take care of the timber trees as usual
J.W. 
21-Oct
1758

Mr. Swaine
Your letter to one of the 16th. inst with notice of your intention to fall the woods at Haynes, Nackalls, Stops, Upper-Down and Robards Down next falling time, has been laid before Mr Treasurer, about which I am Orderd to write to Mr. Chatbourn our Woodreeve, by this Post. I am Sir your humble servant
R.Leeson
To Mr. Nicholas Swain at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent 
21-Oct
1758

Mr Chatbourn
Mr. Swaine has given notice that he intends to fell the Woods at Haynes, Nackatts, Stops Upper Down & Robards Down next falling time when Mr Treasurer desires you will take care to preserve the growing timber trees and to mark such storers and wavers etc as are of it and so many as the custom of those woods and the County require.
I am Sir etc
R Leeson
 
21-Dec
1758

Mr. Chatbourn
Mr. Treasurer has received a Letter from Mr Sankey wherein he requests some Timber to be allowed him for repairs of the barns and for a lodge which is blown down as well as for posts, rails, pails etc now it is not above two years ago since there was a considerable quantity of timber allowed him for most of the above purposes if you can remember the particular repairs that were then done as also the timber you assigned for the same and will send me the account together with what is now absolutely necessary to be done which I hope will not be much, that I may lay it before Mr Treasurer who really thinks that Mr Sankey's demands is more of the most reasonable for it is impossible that the premises can be so much out of repair in so short a time as two years, as Mr Sankey's request for timber would imply.
I am Sir your humble servant
R Leeson
 
09-Jan
1759

Mr. Chatbourn
Before Mr. Treasurer can give you an order to assign any Timber for the repairs to be done at Mr. Sankey's, He desires you will let him know whether it is the barn near the manor house or that in the field adjoining to the north end of Aldelose Down that the plank are so bad, the latter of which barn was adjudged a long time ago by you; and Mr Wright late received of the rents of this Hospital to be not worth supporting as of little or no use if it was of none then it can I think be of none now; you will also let me know what you mean by a new lodge, you may depend apon it that Mr Treasurer will never consent to erect a new lodge or anything else where there never has been anything before.

The number of gates you mention is very great if you can possibly lessen them without any real prejudice to the farm I think it should be done as it will also please to make a calculation now for the old materials will go and what quantity of timber which you were at your own case would assign to complete the repairs.
I am Sir
R.Leeson
 
01-Feb
1759

Mr Swaine
Your letter of the 16th January last has been laid before Mr Treasurer who has orderd me to write that the frequent demand for timber for repairs would make any one conclude that the Wood growing upon the Hospital Estate there was solely appropriated for that purpose the Hospital having received for wood sold within these last 20 years no more than £15.18 You must therefore be more particular in the repairs to be done by maintaining in your next the dimensions of the barn floor to be planked as also the number of Gates Posts Rails before you can have an order for any timber.
The Treasurer approves of having the stable paved with brick instead of having it planked provided it don't exceed the sum you mentioned in your letter and you may set about doing it as soon as you shall think it proper or convenient for you, I must here remind you that there is 8 years arrears of quit rent due at Michaelmas last which I hope you will soon remit to.
Sir your humble servant
R.Leeson
at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
by Ashford Bag
 
01-Feb
1759

Mr. Chatbourn
I must trouble You once more to desire the favour of you to send me word what the labour or workmenship of making a Gate, Style etc. will amount to for by that means one shall be able to determine whether it would not be cheaper for the Hospital to buy the gates etc ready-made than to cut timber down for that purpose, by the frequent applications for Repairs one would imagine that the timber growing upon the Hospital Estate there was designed for no other purpose, for an examining the Hospital books it appears that there has been received no more than £15.18 for timber within these last 20 years a trifling sum indeed.
I am etc
R L
 
05-Apr
1759

Mr. Mount
If there be any pollards or stunted oaks that may serve for posts and rails at Mr. Sankey's they may be taken down as to gates I had rather pay your 7s/ each for the stuff and Mr. Sankey Pay 3/- for workmanship than cut down stuff for them and to buy plank necessary to repair barn floors if Mr. Swain's Barnfloor must be new laid soon better to lay a new one now & what boards are taken up may serve to mend the Barn & Stables at Mr. Swains;
As to Mr.Swain's garden, will take up a great deal of timber I think he should plant a quick hedge with a dry fence until that is high and thick enough to be a good fence for I can't consent to be at the expense of the quantity that you demand to do it, when the trees are taken down mentioned above I desire your Mr Chatbourn to let me know the number of them and where to be used I believe no timber hath been sold near 30 years but demands made frequently for repairs so as to prevent any being sold when you have compleated the work to be done you shall have order for your money
 
04-Oct
1759

Sir
I am ordered by William Mount Esq . Treasurer of this Hospital, to desire the favour of you to pay to Mr. John Chatbourn one woodsearch Ten Pounds, for which credit will be given you on account of your rent
I am Sir your humble servant
R Leeson
To Mr. John Sankey at Hastingleigh
to be left at the Mermaid at Canterbury 
20-Oct
1759

Mr. Chatbourn
I am informed by a letter of the 16th inst. From Mr. Swaine, that he intends to fall at the proper season, Gilnash and Comb Deal shaw, Brockhole shaw, the half acre in Townswood and the shaws upon Staple Lees adjoining to the lower Down. You will please to take care of the timber trees on this occasion, and mark out the storers and wavers to stand as usual.
I am etc
R L
 
13-Nov
1760

Mr. Swaine
I have received the Bill for £43.-.8 on Mr. Blake, but cannot help telling you, that I expected to have received a must larger one, there being now near a year and a half's rent in arrear, which is more than ever was permitted before, you must therefore send me at least, a year's rent between now and Christmas without fail, otherwise you will hear further. The death of your Father, will not, that I know of occasion any alteration in your affairs relative to this Hospital. I write to Mr Chatbourn by this post to acquaint him with your intention of felling the underwoods etc
I am etc
R.L.
To Mr. Thomas Swaine
at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
by Ashford Bag
 
13-Nov
1760

Sir
Having received a letter from Mr Thomas Swaine of the 30th. last month wherein he acquaints one that he intends to fall the upper part of Hardy's springs, Hurst wood and little Wood at Haynes this season is the occasion of my troubling you with this letter to desire that you would give your attention to his proceedings therein; that the growing timber etc may be preserved, agreeable to the term of his lease
I am etc
R.L.
To Mr. John Chatbourn
at Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
10-Nov
1761

Wrote to Mr. Thomas Swaine advising him of the receipt of two bills for £64.9.6
R Leeson
 
19-Nov
1763

Sir
Just after I had wrote a letter in answer to yours of the 11th inst. the postman brought another to one of 18th inst wherein you desire that if yours of the 11th inst. with a bill on Mr. James Blake for £60.1.4 the rent and acquittance due at Michaelmas last, had not as yet come to hand, I would Stop payment when it did, that is, you would not have me present the bill for acceptance. This is all I thank you can mean, or intend I should understand, Now that letter arriving in due course, the bill was tendered the very next day, and was accepted accordingly, and when due (which is not till Thursday next) is made payable at Sir James Hankey's & Co. Fenchurch Street.
I shall write by this post to Mr Chatbourn, relative to your Felling part of Hurst Wood, and also of your wanting a little timber for repairs, which I do suppose he will assign to you in due time.
I am etc
R.L.
To Mr Richard Sankey at Hastingleigh
near Wye to be left at the Fountain
in St. Margaret's Canterbury
 
19-Nov
1763

Sir.
At Monday last I received a letter from Mr Sankey wherein he acquaints me that he shall fell an acre and half of Hurst wood this year. It also requests a little timber for repairs such as posts and rails a cill and door case for the stable and also some more laths for the waggon Lodge he having already had three bundles from Mr Mount. You will therefore see that when he cuts the said wood that the timber trees are preserved and that he is governed by the Covenants on his lease respecting his cutting the woods. As to the repairs you will please to allow him rough timber necessary for them or as you shall think convenient
I am etc
R.L.
To Mr Chatbourn
at Burchall upon Brabourne Lees, Kent
 
01-Nov
1764

Sir
I have received notice from Mr Thomas Swaine that he intends to fall the sheave between Earmons and Deansole and the half acre in Mr Upton's wood next falling time. He also desires some timber may falled for rails and a few posts having none to use.
I shall be glad you will examine into the propriety of his requests and send me your opinion that I may lay it before Mr Treasurer.
I am etc
J.W.
To Mr John Chatbourn
At Hastingleigh Kent
 
13-Dec
1764

Sir
Yours of the 7th inst. I have laid before Mr Treasurer and by his order send this to inform you that he consents to you doing as you therein mentioned for Mr Swain but desires you'll take especial care, that no trees are felled that may be fit for better purposes, or more of what is Fit than absolutely necessary which I hope you will take particular care of.
I am etc
J.W.
To Mr: John Chatbourne 
18-Dec
1764

Sir
Mr Richard Sankey intends to fell two acres and half of wood in Hurst called lately Kingmill Down wood and part of Beaks wood this year therefore desire youll be so good as to examine and mark what's fit to be felled accordingly
I am sir your very humble servant
J.W.
To Mr John Chatbourn
Hastingleigh near Wye
Kent
 
22-Dec
1764

Sir
Yours of the 20th inst. inclosing a draft on Mr. Brown value £22.3.10 came safe to hand and which when paid will clear your rent and the quit rents of Comb Grove up to Michaelmas last.
Shall place the same to the credit of your Account.
I am Sir your very humble servant
J.W.
To
Mr. Thomas Swaine at Hastingleigh
 
04-Jun
1765

Sir
Your two letters of the 30th ultimo enclosing two Bank notes value Thirty Five Pounds and a draft on Mr Blake for Fifteen pounds came safe to hand and I have given your account credit for them, I shall pay due regard to Mr. Chatbourne's direction in future and remain with respect
Sir
Yours etc
J.W.
P S.
Your request of the oak batt, for a roull I have laid before the Treasurer; He has no objection to your having it provided Mr Chatbourn thinks it reasonable but not otherwise
To Mr Thomas Swaine
at Hastingleigh 
13-Jun
1765

Mr Sankey
By Mr Treasurers order this is to inform you that Mr Chatbourn is properly authorised by the Governors of this Hospital to take care of their woods in the County of Kent. And that they will stand by and defend him in such his employ and are much offended at your threatening him for coming on your premises, and expect that for the future you will not dispute their authority in any appointment of this kind, nor give Mr Chatbourn the least molestation in doing his duty
I am Sir
Yours etc
J. W. 
13-Jun
1765

Mr Chatbourn
Mr Treasurer has been informed that Mr Sankey has threatened to trouble you for coming on his premises on which account I have by this post wrote to Mr Sankey to let him know that the Governors are much offended with him for presuming to dispute their authority in appointing who they please to manage their affairs, and expect that he behaves otherwise for the future and you may depend they will stand by and defend you in doing your duty.
They therefore order you to pay no regard to any such threats, which I hope for his own sake he will not offer any more.
I am Sir Yours
J.W.
P.S. Mr Swain requests a tree that is felled to make a roull, Mr Treasurer consents provided you think it reasonable and not otherwise.
To
Mr Chatbourn at Boughton
to be Left at Mr George March' at Faversham
 
25-Jul
1765

Sir
Mr Treasurer has received a letter from Mr Sankey dated the 18th inst in which he expresses a surprise at a letter I wrote him some time since relating to your complaint of his threatening you for coming on his premises and says he never used any other words to you on any account than that you marked knotty timber which was not fit to make bars and gates of and that he thought you used him ill in it; If that is the truth I think you did wrong in making the complaint to me which you did and ought to clear it up.

He desires the large Elm tree which he wrote for in January 1764, which he says is hollow and he expects every high wind it will be blown on the Stable or Waggon lodge. He also as he for a Walnut tree which was blown down last year and he says did him 7 shillings or 8 shillings damage, The Treasurer's answer is that if you think it fit and reasonable he may have them but not otherwise.
You may show him this letter and let him know that what I before wrote him was by the Treasurer's order as well as this.
I am Sir yours
J.W.
To Mr Chatbourn
 
03-Aug
1765

Mr Sankey
In Answer to your letter of the 18th July last enquiry has been made concerning Mr Chatbourn and you and Mr. Treasurer is convinced that Mr. Chatbourn has done his duty to the Hospital; and therefore will support him. He will allow you to trees you ask; If Mr. Chatbourn thinks it right. I hope for the future there will be no more complaints. I have wrote by this post to Mr. Chatbourn by the Treasurer's order to let him know that he is satisfied with his conduct and will support him in his office so long as he acts properly.
I am Sir your very humble servant.
J.W.
at Hastingleigh
near Wye in Kent
to be left at the fountain in St. Margaret's Canterbury
 
03-Aug
1765

Mr Chatbourn
Yours of the 28th July I have laid before the Treasurer, who desires your continuance as woodreeve I have wrote by this Post to Mr.Sankey to let him know Mr Treasurer will support you in everything that is right and that he is convinced you have acted no otherwise I have also informed him that the Treasurer will allow him the trees he asks for; if you approve of his having them. If you do not, and think it fit they should be cut down, you may sell them for the Hospital's use I hope when you come to town everything will be agreeable to you.
I am Sir your very humble servant
J.W.
To Mr Chatbourn at Boughton to be left at Mr. George March's Faversham 
18 Dec 1765
1765

Sir
Mr Richard Sankey intends to Fell two acres and half of wood in Hurst; called Kingmill Down wood and Part of Beak's wood this year; therefore desire you'll be so good as to examine and mark what's fitt to be felled accordingly.
I am Sir
Your very humble servant
J.W.
To Mr John Chatbourn Hastingleigh near Wye Kent
05-Feb
1766

Sir
In your last to me of the 8th Past. You mention a Herriott due to the Manor of Grove on the death of Mr Pilcher that when you demanded it of his son he told you the Estate was given, him by deed above four years before, his Father died. If that be true he can have no objection to show you that deed which you have a right to see by your lease. Therefore please to desire him to produce it which if he should refuse let him know that you have, orders to seize for it.

I should have mentioned this in my last when I gave you notice of the receipt of the drafts but thought it best to consult Mr Morse on the affair first. And he orders you to seize on the above demand being refused but if the Father did by deed give the Estate to his son in his life time the Governors have no right to a Herriott.
I thank you for the information of the Herriott on Sankeys. and shall write to him about it without mention of you.
I am Sir your very humble servant
J W
To
Mr Thomas Swaine
05-Feb
1766

Mr Sankey
I find a Herriott is due to the Governors of this Hospital on your Estate this is to desire you will take care that they may not lose it if any difficulty should arise in the affair let me know. Shall be glad to have an account from yourself about it.
I am your very humble servant
J.W.
22-Oct
1766

Sir
I have received notice from Mr. Swaine that he intends to fall the wood against Mr Sankeys wood and the sheaves round the Hooks next falling time. He also informed me that you would be glad of an order from the treasurer relating to the timber for his repairs which I here send you as under And also what he agreed to allow Mr. Sankey.
I am etc
J.W.

Timber to be allowed Mr. Swaine to repair the Well, the Lumber Room, and the floor of the Granary. According to your discretion to be allowed Mr. Sankey 50 feet for the posts and rails about the house and what you think necessary for the pailing before the House. Proper timber for repairing the Granary.
If elm will do, use those marked unsound.
Proper timber to repair the pound and what timber is on the Estate proper for lathing the house but if more is wanting for that purpose than is on the Estate, Mr. Sankey must provide it himself.
N.B. the elm trees must not be cut down
To
Mr. Chatbourn at
Boughton to be left at Mr George March's in Faversham
21-Jul
1767

Sir
Yours of 3rd inst to Mr Treasurer would have been answered sooner had I not been out of town but on examining your lease can find no sort of room to grant your request although the Treasurer would be glad to oblige you yet in this case thinks it will be a wrong thing to grant it.
I am with Respect Sir
Your very humble servant
J .W.
To
Mr. Richard Sankey at Hastingleigh
to be left at the Fountain in St. Margaret's Canterbury .
27-Aug
1768

Sir
I received yours of the 9th with the account of Mr Sankey's suffering his ewes and lambs to run where they ought not. I should be glad you would let me know as soon as you can what damage they have done to the woods and will then get our attorney to write to Mr Sankey about it. I know nothing more to be done in this affair.
I am your humble servant
J.W.
To
Mr Chatbourne
02-Dec
1769

Sir.
In Answer to yours of the 23rd ultimo. Mr Treasurer agrees to the repairs being done at the farms in the manner you mention that is 20 pair of rails, 2 trees for gates and two trees to mend the barn floors at Court Lodge, one elm for boards and three trees for gates and rails at Combe farm. I desire that particular care may be taken that the timber is all used in a proper manner.

T. R. C.
04-Aug
1773

To Thomas Swaine a lease of the Demesnes of the Manors of Coomb Grove and Fanscomb called Coomb Farm and Smeads Farm in Wye and Hastingleigh in the county of Kent with the under Woods containing 67 acres now on lease to him which will expire at Michaelmas 1773 for a term of Twenty one years from the expiration of his present lease at the charge yearly rent of £120 the tenant to do all repairs and to have the Liberty to cut this underwoods at any time between 12 and 16 years growth and to sell as much Saintfoin or straw as he brings on of fodder.
31-Jul
1776

To Thomas Kidder a lease of the farm at Hastingleigh and Aldelose now on lease to Mr Richard Sankey which will expire at Michaelmas 1776 for the term of 21 years from that period at the clear yearly rent of £100 the tenants to do all repairs as settled by Mr John Mascall being allowed such rough Timber as Mr Mascall may allott.
08-Aug
1781

To John Sawbridge esq. A lease for 99 years at a pepper corn rent of about One acre and Twenty Two perches of land part of the fields called the Nicketts part of Combe Grove Farm at Hastingleigh in Kent in lease to Thomas Swaine in exchange for a lease from Mr Sawbridge to the Hospital for the same term and rent of about the same quantity of land belonging to Mr Sawbridge upon Wye Down adjoining to part of such farm Mr Sawbridge agreeing to fence off the land to be taken by him in exchange and to keep such fence afterwards in repair at his own expense provided the tenant who is to enjoy the land to be taken by the Hospital in exchange during the remainder of his lease consents to such exchange and the clerk was directed to apply to him for such consent.
08-Aug
1782

Sir John Honywood Bart. Gave a legacy of £100 to St. Thomas Hospital.
30-Jul
1794

To Sir John Honywood Bart. of Comb Grove and Smeed farm in Wye and Hastingleigh in Kent with the underwoods (lately held under Lease to Thomas Swaine which expired at Michaelmas 1794 at £120 Per Annum) for a term of 21 years from that time at a Rent of £150 Per Annum clear of the Land-tax and all other taxes and deductions whatsoever and to be allowed Rough Timber for the Repairs of the Buildings. to be set out by the Hospital Agent.
18-Dec
1794

To grant a Lease to Sir John Honywood Bart. of Comb Grove and Smeeds Farm in Wye and Hastingleigh in Kent with the underwoods (lately held under Lease to Thomas Swaine at £120 per Annum which expired at Michaelmas last) for a term of 21 years from that time at a rent of £150 per Annum clear of the Land tax and all other taxes and deductions whatsoever and to be allowed Rough Timber for the Repairs of the Buildings to be set out by the Hospital Agent.
29-Jul
1795

We have granted leases to the following persons vizt:
To Mr Thomas Kidder of the Mansion house called The Great Lodge and the demesne lands of the Manors of Hastingleigh Aldelose in Hastingleigh and Wye in the County of Kent and the underwoods belonging thereto for a term of 21 years from Michaelmas 1797.
(for time of the expiration of the present lease)
at a rent of £130. clear of the land tax and all other taxes and out goings, Mr. Kidder putting the buildings and fences into repair to the satisfaction of the Hospital Agent and keeping the same in repair during the term, being allowed rough timber by the Hospital and insuring and keeping the same insured during the term and upon other the terms and conditions contained in Mr. Kidder's present lease.
15-Feb
1797

Mr. Treasurer reporting that Sir John Honywood's rent of his farm at Hastingleigh is considerably in arrears and that he has repeatedly applied to him for payment without effect.

Ordered that the clerk to take the necessary measures for the recovery of the Rent under the Treasurer's direction.
02-Aug
1797

Sir John Honywood not having yet paid his rent
Ordered-That unless it be paid within a fortnight from this term a distress be made for the same upon the farm or such other legal provisions taken for the recovery thereof as the Treasurer shall think proper and [...] that the clerk do write to him to acquaint him with this resolution-
Agreed-
22-Jul
1799

Mr Kidder
I am directed to inform you of a resolution of the Grand Committee that all rent for Estates are to be paid half yearly, and a little before the second half year becomes due that is the rent due at Michaelmas is to be paid by the middle of March following, so that nearly half a year is left in hand. There is now due from you one year on Lady Day last, also when you paid £100 in December last, the advanced rent from March 1797 to Lady day 1798 was not included which is £15. You will please to observe this resolution of the Committee must be attended to tenants for houses are not to be allowed more than 2 months.
I am Sir your most humble servant
E.J.
Mr Thomas Kidder at Hastingleigh near Wye, Kent
21-Nov
1799
Sir
On my return from the west last week I met you in favour of the 3d: the Game there advised of, came safe. I would not be over pressing on this article but if anything comes in your way between this and Christmas it will be acceptable but a day or two before xmas day anything will be agreeable.
We have not taken a final step towards redeeming last lay but must soon determine:
We have procured Certificates for most of our Estates, therefore shall be obliged if you can procure Certificates for yours, Mr. Kidder but not to enter into contract. Shall be glad with dispatch
I perfectly approve of felling Timber that won't improve anything, or this head will be attended to, and much obliged for your care of the quit rent.
I am Sir your most obedient servant
E. J.
Mr John Browning Hastingleigh near Wye
28-Nov
1799

To Thomas Kidder
Mr Kidder
Sir
The keeping back of your rent has given great discontent, the Committee is now more strict than it used to be;
I by your will, fix a time when I may tell them
It may be depended on in a former letter I stated how it stood.
Please to say what is the sum you pay for Land tax. I think it is either £5 or £4. The draft of your lease was sent some time ago for your perusal but has not been returned.
I am Sir
Your most humble servant
E.J.
NB. Last week I received a Hare.
11-Mar
1800

To Mr. J Browning Hastingleigh near Wye
Mr. Browning
I am obliged for your favour of the 6th. The three parcels of timber you mention, if oak the time for felling is coming on, if otherwise perhaps the season is too far advanced, if not it will be best to sell immediately, and without loss of time to do the same with the oak for boat builders.
Our rule for rents of Estates is the half year due at Michaelmas to be paid at least a week or two before Lady day.
Shall be glad with the account of quit rents and a statement raised(?) as near as can be possibly made out and described .
I am Sir your most obedient servant
E.J.
18-Mar
1800

To Mr. John Browning , Hartingleigh near Wye
Sir
I received yours of the 17th covering a Bill value Eighty Pounds of which £75 is for half a year's rent due at Xmas last from Sir John Honywood & Five pounds on account of quit rents. I will speak to our clerk about satisfying those Gentlemen who object to pay. I doubt not your case about the timber.
Your most obedient servant
E.J.
I hope you are much recovered.
25-Nov
1801

To Mr John Browning Hastingleigh near Wye
Sir
I am favoured with yours of the 24th enclosing a remittance of One hundred and Thirteen Pounds 57. and I now return you a receipt for £112.12.for three quarters rent etc due from Sir John Honywood at the Lady day last.
The Balance of 13s/. in Your favour I shell hold till I have the pleasure of seeing you.
The Hospital Regulation respecting the payment of the rents of its farms, as settled by the Grand Committee is this;
That the Tenants shall pay the rent due at Michaelmas after immediately after Lady day and the Lady day Rent at Michaelmas; in other words they are to hold half a year in hand but to be punctual in their payments.
I know not whether your Manor abounds in Game, but it will, I know, be agreeable to the Treasurer, as often as you can conveniently procure it, to receive some from you.
I am Sir
Your most obedient servant
J.D.
03-Dec
1801

To Mr. J. Browning Hastingleigh near Wye
Sir
The Treasurer desires me to acknowledge the receipt of your general letters of the 11th October and 1st inst announcing your despatch of two Baskets of Game both of which came safe and in good order.
He thanks you for your attention to him in these instances, and for your signification of its being the wish of Sir John Honywood that he should receive of request supply of Game from that Manor.
He will be obliged to you to make his complements to Sir John and to thank him for his polite anticipation of a matter in which they think alike and which he has for some time had it in contemplation to make known to Sir John: That as the Treasurership of this Hospital is a Post of Honour, but of no ernolumen t he considers the supply of Game as his chief perquisite that therefore those gentlemen who have the Treasurers Deputations upon the Hospital Manors he hopes shall feel themselves called upon to let him in for a liberal share of the benefit of their field sports, and that while they deserve Health and Amusement from the chase he may, at his table as well his friends have the honour of frequently remembering them in his libations.
He has lately been arranging a plan with the keepers on the manors at a convenient distance from town to send him alternate supplies during the season and if you will put him down in your remembrance as a claimant once a fortnight and can contrive it to arrive here on or before Fridays, every wish he has on the subject will be answered. The next time you come to town he hopes to have the pleasure of seeing you.
I am etc
J.D.
05-May
1803

To Mr. J. Browning Hastingleigh near Wye
Sir.
I have received your favour of the 9th Inst enclosing a bill (due the 15th Inst) on Stephenson Balsam & Co. for £75 for half a year rent due from Sir J. Honywood Bart. at Michaelmas last, which will be duly placed to his credit, and for which I now return you the receipt.
Will you be so good, at your leisure, or when you have occasion to write again, to let me know for the information of the Treasurer what timber there is on the estate fit to cut, or rather that ought to be cut for the benefit of the Hospital. We have had no returns of this kind since the year 1800, and as the Treasurer has never seen the Estate he wishes to know how many years are necessary to intervene between each fall. At Parndon in Essex, where the Hospital has about 100 acres in wood we have falls every year. Your woods contain, I believe between 60 and 70 Acres, and if from the poverty of the soil or any other circumstance, it may not be advisable to have annual falls, you have I presume a certain rule to go by, and your information on the subject will be acceptable
I am etc
J.D.
The Treasurer desires his comp..

23-Aug
1804

To Sir John Honeywood Bart . N.7 Little Argyle Street
Sir,
I have great pleasure in complying with your request, and shall be glad Kidder's appointment may be a means of preserving the rights of the Hospital which I am anxious to maintain. It will be necessary to have the deputation rejected by the clerk of the peace for the County.
I am etc
A.C.
When you are in town for the winter I shall be glad to have the pleasure of seeing you
The deputation stamp is 26/- which if you will have the goodness to pay to Mr Deannery, he can include it when next remittance.
J.D.
07-Feb
1805

To Mr W. Browning Wye
Sir
I have received and laid before the Treasurer your letter of the 5th announcing the death of your worthy and lamented Father, and he joins with me in expressing his regret on an event which has deprived his family and the world of such a respectable character-Having had so good an opinion of the man the Treasurer agrees well of the branches, and willingly agrees to accept your services in the management and sale of the timber that grows upon the Hastingleigh estate.
your father wrote to him in Nov[ember] on this subject, and his account was the ash timber which can be felled this season, I should recommend being cut if not in an improvable state and such oak as will be good carpenters timber as the demand is great and the price high!
In addition to this you speak of some ... timber upon Mr Kidder's farm which is well casusin(?) to take down.
The Treasurer refers the whole to your care and management not doubting but you will do your best for the charity, and after you have surveyed or agreed for the falls, he will be glad to be informed what the quantity of each sort of timber will be, and the price it sells for.
I wrote to your father the 30 October, and enclosed him a receipt for half a year rent due the preceding Lady day.
I am etc J. B.
.